Difficulty with Nose Breathing from Deviated Septum

  Young woman with sinus pressure pain.

There are many different factors that can cause difficulty breathing through the nose. Chronic sinusitis is a condition where recurring sinus infections continually interrupt your life, and medications are not productive. Sinusitis or chronic nasal problems do not respond well to medication and will likely lead to more severe symptoms developing over time. However, another issue that some people have – that many people are not even aware of – is a deviated septum. Extreme unevenness in the septum (the cartilage that divides the nostrils) can cause health complications such as difficulty breathing.

According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology, 80% of people have some degree of septum deviation. Yet, a deviated septum only requires medical attention if it negatively impacts a person’s quality of life.

The most common symptoms of a deviated septum include:

  • Difficulty breathing through the nose
  • Recurring sinus infections
  • Nasal congestion or pressure that does not go away
  • Nosebleeds
  • One side of the nose continually feeling “blocked”
  • Dryness in one nostril
  • Snoring or loud breathing during sleep
  • Facial pain

Dr. Greg Levitin aims to provide patients from all across the Northeast with safe and long-lasting solutions for breathing problems that disrupt their lives. Receiving an accurate diagnosis will provide you with answers and guide you on your path toward effective treatment. Dr. Levitin can help with both.

Dr. Greg Levitin and his team are focused on offering comprehensive care to all patients. Your nasal airway plays an integral part in how you breathe. A deviated septum can affect the quality of your breathing, whether you are asleep or awake. You may feel tired during the day when engaged in simple activities, or when you retire for the night, you may experience interrupted or poor sleep. Neither scenario is good for your overall health and can contribute to heart problems later in life if not treated.

Contact our New York practice to schedule an appointment with Dr. Greg Levitin.